Friday, October 26, 2012

The vagabond's song...



The vagabond's song cries out 'come home - come home'
a place that eludes him for his spiritual need
but the winding labyrinth leads him to roam

Following the vision of an attendant mirage's path
he traverses nebulous miles as his heart bleeds
but the vagabond's song cries out  'come home - come home'

If there's a madness about nary an unsettled wrath
he travels audatiously where side roads lead
but the winding labyrinth leads him to roam

Sages speak of wisdom a road less traveled hath
of wanderlust, a fountain of youth, wilderness creed
but the vagabond's song cries out 'come home - come home'

Sagas tell of men fighting a Spanish War or Goliath
of a hallucinating knight's noble dream and his steed
but the winding labyrinth leads him to roam

He longs for drifting the unknown using strange math
the taste of passionate addiction on which he feeds
The vagabond's song cries out  'come home - come home'
but the winding labyrinth leads him to roam



At    dVerse Poets Pub   dversepoets.com  today Samuel Peralta brings us the villanelle, a poetry form used by Dylan Thomas   ("Do not go gentle into that good night")  Oscar Wilde and others....we are to try our hand at it ...
...the pattern of the villanelle is illustrated as A1bA2 - abA1 - abA2 - abA1 - abA2  - abA1A2 where"a" and "b" are the two ryhmes, and the uper case lines ("A1" and "A2") indicate the refrains...




12 comments:

  1. An interesting use of the form, with an asymmetric feel, despite the repeating lines. The labyrinth does have a powerful call.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I too would now like to try this poetic form ... your work really inspired me !!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. smiles...very nice....the road has a tight call on me at times....and that makes for a nice contrast to home....i got my chance to go home though....smiles....nice on the form...

    ReplyDelete
  4. oh that vagabond song...think i can sing it as well...but then...no place like home, right...? being 4 weeks away from my fam right now...and yeah...missing them...

    ReplyDelete
  5. You captured the conflicted heart here very well. The nostalgia and wanderlust both competing, which seems psychologically quite real. K.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Lovely and lyrical, strange and mythic - truth too repeats in stanzas - the human spirit long to follow the unknown paths and yearns for home. Well said, artfully constructed!

    ReplyDelete
  7. This poem harkens back to the origins of the villanelle as a "song of the village", a troubador's song, and lends its meandering rhythm to the journey described.

    ReplyDelete

All comments, constructive and otherwise, are welcome and appreciated here. Thank you to those who show an interest in my quirky style of writing, photography, painting, and presenting a feeling or thought and for stopping by A Dwelling by the Sea..