Tuesday, March 19, 2013

RLS....an experience...

Today is Saturday
the cat is gray....
the rain won't go away,
I can't sit still, my legs are on a mission
my neck finds no comfortable position
Scratching my calf..my legs stiffen
..TAKE A PILL
before it's too late....
the misery of faraway reaching 
..that still
does not scratch that delicious spot..
won't abate
Restless, sleepless
it helps to sway
they say it's a nerve condition
cannot exercise it away
invisible..treated with skepticism

People mock sardonically
 I toss and turn all night...  
...kicking involuntarily
having to move, I rub my knees
...such a strange malady!                                                                              
Steady worsening means                                                                               my relaxed legs 
pacing  constantly
..kind of burn or ache... 
heightened sensitivity
..hard to describe..
possibly like being on speed
Heavy eyelids make it impossible
to watch TV 
Not obsessive compulsive disorder,
hypochondria or ADHD 
not psychosomatic or 
my imagination
Drives me crazy!

Ask those with a similar plight
finding a way to live with degrees
of chronic pains, no end in sight
Amazingly, an antidote 
now exists to relieve 
symptoms, 
to be taken at onset 
..before it attacks
more dopamine                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     ......otherwise it has to run it's course....and yes,
IT IS REAL...and it's got a hold on me..
                              ,,,,,, it's not make believe





 It's Open Link Night at  dversepoets.com :

 I wrote this in the middle of a Restless Leg Syndrome episode..I understand if you should  laugh, but it is a real condition I've had for several years now.  Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome were once thought to be fabrications or misdiagnoses, even hallucinatory.. and so it is with RLS.  Since the G Nome has been isolated, more diseases as well are being understood.  We now know this is can be treated with a derivative of a drug used to treat Parkinson's Disease, and I don't know what I would do without it as it allows me to sleep.  The same is true for varied uses of anti-convulsive medicines..they have a variety of helpful uses.. other than the obvious.  Education is always helpful.  There are much worse things, but this can interfere, although distraction from pain can help.  The controversy lies in the source of the syndrome.  Thanks in advance for reading;)


60 comments:

  1. A friend of mine has this, and I know for sure that it is definitely not a laughing matter. Thank you for posting this.

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    1. A lot of people don't like to hear or read about others' aches and pains but I had written it and thought I'd take a chance. Always good to impart info to help clear up things.
      Thanks for stopping by, Lisa.

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  2. You are brave to confront this with a poem.

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    1. Either brave or desperate ;) Thank you.

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  3. than you for being brave enough to share
    pain that many would want you to laugh away as mere imaginings
    I too live with chronic pain, joint after joint after joint

    will be praying for you

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    1. Ouch...it's part of getting older, genetics, and I think environmental, too..and, a lottery. Even if one takes good care of himself it can happen. I return your thought.

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  4. I didn't know whether to laugh or cry reading this, because I felt like doing both. That was before I read your notes, then I did shed a tear. I feel for you. I know wht it is to suffer something no one can see, but we know is oh so real.
    Thanks for sharing this piece. Please stay off the speed though ;-)

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    1. Ha..I've never taken anything stronger that marijuana..and thanks.

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  5. whew...oy....i feel the restlessness in the rhythm of your words....and must not be a whole lot of fun to deal with either if it comes on at night....i am sorry you have to deal with this...its an honest write....and to the poem it has a great rhythm and internal rhyme as well...as i said it plays well to the subject...and i applaud your willingness to write about it...

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    1. everyone has something, as I see it..I am not in as much pain, as in back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, migraines, tooth pain, kidney stones and any number of maladies and consider myself lucky. It could be much, much worse. I just thought it might be of interest. The medicine helps to control it...like something for heartburn, but if one didn't have it as an option they would be pretty uncomfortable.
      Thanks, Brian

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  6. Oh, Katy, I could have written this. It's the worst. When I was on dialysis before my transplant, it almost drove me insane. And I agree with Brian--the rhythm of the words made me feel it, and want to scream.

    Just remembered my mom who used to suffer immensely with RLS. One time she was in her rocking chair and got so mad she started beating on the arm rests and the whole chair fell over on her!

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    1. Thanks for your comment. I really appreciate it. Oh dear, your mother!

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  7. My dad has this... You did such a great job of capturing the emotions behind the symptoms. I hope you are able to find some relief!

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  8. Yes, the medicine helps a lot..but if I wait too long..oh, oh ;)Thanks for visiting.

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  9. I think I have a little of this but it doesn't bother me so much ~ Hope your pain goes away or is relieved a bit ~ Thanks for the personal share ~ Take care ~

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    1. Thank you, Grace. As you know if it is not visible people tend to think you are exaggerating..I kind of wish it came with a rash -ha!

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  10. This really sounds miserable. I had heard of this, but never had such a good description of it as you provided in your poem. I am glad there is something you can take to alleviate the symptioms. I too am one who appreciates the personal share.

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    1. Thank you, Mary; sometimes it's better not to share some things, depending on the situation, and I don't want sympathy, so that was my main fear here.

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  11. I knew this was about RLS before reading your post note. It sounds like a nightmare. Your poem makes the reader feel the uncomfortable torment. Good writing.

    Pamela

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    1. Obviously I didn't notice it in the title, good heavens. I need my eyes checked.

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  12. A really great write here. I so understand. I have Fibromylgia so have pain all the time from over active nerves. I rarely, in my lifetime, have slept through the night and then it is from exhaustion. Commenting from dVerse.

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    1. OH, I'm sure you do. I believe there is a connection as I have it as well. What helps is swimming but you have to do it consistently ;)

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  13. Husband has been affected by health related problems including dermatopolymyositis which affects muscles and yes, RLS, which seems more prevalent when he is overtired. I can sympathize with your plight. Thank you for sharing your story.

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  14. i can truly relate and understand the way you must feel on the longest nights. I think you manage to communicate the state V well: its hard to say this stuff outloud sometimes and you can be perceived as a whinger BUT i think your PO stands up and, as i say, i understand: take care.

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    1. I appreciate your comment, Arron; thanks, I can guarantee my next posts will be more uplifting ;)

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  15. a friend of mine has this as well and really makes long car drives or flights a big pain for her...glad that there is a medicine that helps, easing the symptoms..

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    1. She must have it with her always, as I do; I function quite well now that I was diagnosed, know what is going one and I am so thankful for the medicine. Walking helps but not as much as one might think. I certainly hope this didn't come across as whining. Maybe it will help someone else. Thanks, Claudia. Time to turn off the lights;)

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  16. "invisible..treated with skepticism" such a great line and really speaks to the understanding that so many deal with things others do not understand. you did a wonderful job of giving a very visual description of what you are feeling. I hope you found sleep.

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  17. I'm just fine..just wanted to get a message out ..thank you ;)

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  18. This reads like perfect rap -- I could hear the beat and the repeats.

    Fantastic diary and witness.

    In medicine, if we don't know how to treat something, we make it YOUR fault. We imagine you crazy, twisted and weird -- and we certainly don't want you to return.
    Well not until some kind scientist takes you seriously (perhaps by reading your poem), does the work and figures out that a preemptive blast of a catecholamine to the black brain (sustantia nigra) cures the insane. Wait -- they were never insane, it was us. Tiring of healing the sick, which apparently even Jesus experienced, we blamed others.

    Fantastic write -- and thanks for again reminding this silly provider to stop blaming and seek understanding instead.

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    1. In general there is a blanket attitude toward some patients that lacks sensitivity by some doctors but surely some must be due to burn out. There is so much responsibility attached to being a doctor. But patients, too, are responsible for doing their part in communicating their concerns, symptoms and following though with self care. Shock treatments for everyone!? Ha..then 'first do no harm'...also, there are lawyers who need reminding to take care of their own legal affairs in advance instead of waiting until it's too late. I guess I'm getting off track here, but I appreciate your perspective and experience, Sabio.

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  19. Hmmmm, my comment above left of my name -- 'twas I!

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  20. Reading this made me want to walk around a bit. It definitely conveyed that restless feeling.

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  21. not laughing... so sad you have to go through that... thanks for helping us understand better... healing ot you

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  22. Your poem made me feel what you're feeling. Such a misunderstood syndrome, just one of many that still need more compassion and understanding among those who haven't experienced these firsthand.

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    1. One of many is so true; with communication the way it is now, more info is reaching those who otherwise might not have had ready access a while ago. My pet peeve is that the appropriate audiences for many topics ignore or don't wish to read about certain things. Thanks for stopping by.

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  23. I too have restless leg syndrome and sympathize with your restless nights. Is there anything worse than being nearly asleep and having your own body jostle you awake? There probably are worse things but at the time that it happens when you know that the night will not be peaceful, the despair and frustration are overwhelming. Well expressed.

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    1. I understand..there are worse things some friends of mine and people I know are going through. But when I sat down and wrote about an episode I was curious how it would be received and I'm glad to share the description of how it feels and to get some validation you and others feel it they same way that I do :) Thanks, Beth

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  24. Oh, that must be so aggravating. I can't help but think about an episode of an old Helen Hunt sitcom, Mad About You, and how she kicked her husband all night.

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  25. There's a lot of metaphor here, that drives something beyond just pain and physical symptoms,revealing the underlying fragility and impermanence of life. Glad you have found some relief.

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    1. Thanks for visiting..one never knows quite what will come along that will bring attention again and again to that fragility of health..well said.

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  26. A very educational poem that highlights how people can be dismissive of ailments that clearly have a real and detrimental effect. Glad to hear there's a medicine for you.

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  27. I've heard about this, and I perfectly understand it's not a laughing matter (ailment seldom are) but I am so happy there are medicines to decrease your syntoms.

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    1. ..so many things people make fun of that others cannot control..another pet peeve of mine is when mental illness is made fun of....i.e. crazy loony, psycho..etc.

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  28. This is a new condition to me - but it sounds awful. The rhythm and pace of your poem capture something of how it must feel; I can only imagine that the reality is much worse.

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    1. thanks for stopping by..uncomfortable to say the least..

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  29. I'm a believer...I imagine it is quite hard to explain exactly what it feels like. I'm glad there is something out there that can help relieve the constant — for lack of a better term — "leg anxiety."

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  30. A great capture. I feel you.... I've had arthritis since I was eight and it's always a battle with the pain.

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  31. Oh, this really got to me. I've had this at times, and it is horrible. Impossible to relax. I once read that it could be caused by too much iron, but I don't know at all - you describe it wonderfully well--so sorry that you have it.

    (I seem to only get it now at certain performances - it's just awful.)
    k.

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    1. ..I heard lack of iron, but they aren't conclusive studies..hope you don't get it permanently

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  32. Long ago I suffered from a mild RLS-- just as I'd about fall asleep, my legs would jump!-- I find, as I'm older and perhaps I am not on my feet all day like I was when I was younger, it no longer occurs. Best of luck resolving and healing :) ~peace, Jason

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    1. Thank you..I'm glad it subsided for you ;)

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  33. So sorry to hear this! I hope it gets better--or goes away!

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  34. I hear you on the RLS. Recently at a pain management clinic the doctor said the spasms and cramps which had been waking me up shrieking a few times a night were related to RLS. The medication he prescribed helps - at the cost of nausea and headaches. So I am back to the spasms. My choice I suppose.
    However, a night with interrupted or poor sleep makes everything harder doesn't it? I do hope you find lasting relief.

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    1. Thank you for commenting; I'm glad your can tolerate some without the medicine..the side effects sometimes are worse..and yes, it's hard on the body to lose sleep for whatever reason ;)

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All comments, constructive and otherwise, are welcome and appreciated here. Thank you to those who show an interest in my quirky style of writing, photography, painting, and presenting a feeling or thought and for stopping by A Dwelling by the Sea..